In Person Training VS Online Training

well HELLLLOOOOO there!

It has been forever since I’ve shared a post with you, and I apologize, but I’ve been a little bit BUSY.

Once you’re all caught up on that, you’ll be happy to know that living the majority of my life in a gym has really helped to inspire what I hope will be incredibly helpful posts.

So let’s dig in to today’s post and hash out the benefits of different types of training.

One of the biggest issues facing training today is that it has been cheapened by its own. Trainers who deal under the table and use fitness facilities without expecting to pay has driven facility pricing up and the professionalism of training down. This is a pattern that professionals like myself are trying to fight.

So, how do you know if you’re getting a GOOD personal trainer?

Well, for starters I would recommend being a bit more picky when choosing your personal trainer.

Think of your personal trainer as a part of your medical team. Would you go to just any old doctor off the street? Your trainer should be chosen with care.

Once you have established how to pick a trainer, the question may then be if you should hire an in-house trainer at your local gym or an online trainer. And here is where it can be tricky….

Training is not regulated. Anybody can open an online training business and call themselves a personal trainer (or worse, a celebrity trainer).

fake personal trainer

One BIG upside to hiring an in-house trainer is that most gyms require a national certification and they make sure trainers keep up with continuing education credits.

So, when you looked in to that online trainer who charges over $100 a month, did you research their credentials? Do your homework and keep yourself protected.

Another issue with training is what I believe to be the BIGGEST thing an in-person trainer can help with: FORM.

A hands on trainer can help make minute adjustments that lead to better muscle recruitment which will in turn help you reach your goal faster. These adjustments need to be made in person, cause I don’t care how awesome you think you are, Skype won’t cut it when you need to truly make adjustments. Hands on adjustments make all the difference in the world AND help to prevent injury.

In house trainers can also help you to track progress more effectively. PLUS, if you struggle with getting workouts in, an in-house trainer is a great way to set up that habit. My clients are given homework to complete each week and I ask them to check in with me at the gym, even if they don’t have an appointment that day. This ramps up the accountability factor we all need.

Are all trainers created equal?

Absolutely not!

I am blessed with a staff of trainers who are willing to continue to learn. A lot of trainers are only willing to go as far as the money. A good trainer will give you more than you paid for. A great trainer will depend on science to blow theory out of the water and help you reach your goals faster than you thought possible.

ron b science

So, how do you pick a trainer?

Do your research.

If a trainer is dealing underhanded and unwilling to pay a gym to train there, they won’t be fully committed to you either. An online trainer should be researched just as carefully and make sure you’re not simply looking at pictures……you can get those anywhere.

Seek out referrals for a good trainer in your area OR check out ideafit.com for a listing.

Is training cheap?

I wouldn’t trust it if it were. Good training will encompass the entire lifestyle, so it should take a chunk of time out of the trainers schedule. Consider this when looking at trainers. Also consider the fact that the better and more experienced the trainer, the more expensive they will be.

When it comes down to the nitty-gritty for training, you are paying for far more than that 1 hour session. If you’re lucky enough to get a trainer/nutritionist combo, then you should be getting plenty of nutrition education along with strength training, exercise sequencing, cardio workouts, flexibility training and core work (every day with me is core work). This is why training should be considered an investment. If your trainer doesn’t take your investment seriously, find another trainer.

no free training

Training is a great way to get results, stay injury free and develop a love for fitness…..IF you find the right fit.

Keep on moving,

Michelle

 

 

How heavy should it be?

The weight you lift, I mean….

I think I just had a Yoda moment :-P

O.K. Let’s move onto the meat of the matter shall we?

doyoueven-terminator

One thing I see a LOT in the gym (aside from many varying forms of weight lifting that could possibly kill somebody) are ladies lifting light.

I mean, like LIGHT. Before I move on I must say that I’m not talking about squatting the bar because you are working on form and building muscle. I am not talking about brand new lifters who NEED to start lighter than they usually do. I’m talking about those groups of ladies (cause they tend to be in flocks) who are so afraid to lift heavy they stay lighter than they should. This post is for you.

Womens-Weightlifting-Meme-2

Let’s bust the common myth: weight lifting will not make you bulky or huge. Tuck that fact away. Women can benefit greatly from regular weight lifting. If you’re not trying to compete, you can get by with 3-5 lifts per week and reap the benefits such as:

  • Increased lean muscle mass
  • Increased metabolism
  • Increase bone density (it’s more important to you when you’re older so start now)
  • Increased tendon and ligament strength
  • Fewer injuries such as joint rolls and sprains
  • Higher self-esteem
  • Increased energy….once you find your balance :)
  • Increased libido (Helloooooooo, nurse!)
  • Tighter skin

I could go on and on, but we’ll stick with these for now. Most women won’t lift heavy due to the fact that they worry they will look bulky. If these women DO try some heavy weights, chances are they may experience the slight swelling that can occur when your tissue expands due to the load. This will usually dissipate after a while, but some ladies get scared. They may also notice the scale moving on up and find that disturbing. Well, contrary to the popular saying, muscle and fat weigh the same. I mean, a pound is a pound right? The fact is muscle is far more dense than fat and therefore it takes up less space. Less space makes for a leaner body overall.

Are you sold on the heavier weights yet?

Once you start to take in all the benefits, the next question is ALWAYS, “How heavy should I lift?”

In my own opinion, I think you should second guess your lack of spotter :) but let’s break it down by goal.

Weight lifting really is a numbers game. Everything you do is like an algebraic equation that is solved by your body. So, let’s take a look at popular goals and the algebra one can use to reach them.

  1. You have some body fat to melt and you want things to STOP jiggling pronto: With this goal your best bet is a rep range of 12-15, meaning the weight should almost be immovable by the time you hit 13-14. Notice, you are going for a FEELING here. You’ll notice the more you lift that you have strong days and not-so-strong days. Take it in stride and always show up.
  2. You’re over 35 years old/have experienced a HUGE weight loss/are noticing loose skin OR all of the above: THIS is my specialty. The rep range you are shooting to hit is 6-8 (some scientists offer 4 is good, but I find my joints will give out when I go that heavy). Again, you’re going for a feeling here. The weight should be immoveable by the time you hit 7-8. This particular rep range with heavy-duty weight (adjusted to your specific strength) has been shown to increase elasticity in the skin by increasing the production of collagen. It also helps to force produce more testosterone, which will help bring balance to hormones that become imbalanced with age AND it helps to spice up that sometimes lagging libido.
  3. You want to compete on American Ninja Warrior……or you dig endurance sports. Your particular rep range protocol is anywhere from 15-30. This will be lighter weight and focus on different muscle fibers to pull the load. You may use 5 pounds for an overhead press, but by the time you reach 30 reps I promise your shoulders are on fire. Tis builds endurance in the muscle and increases endurance between the mind/muscle connection.

I know it seems complicated, but here’s the deal: you have to know your body and know your goal. Since I have lost so much weight, I actually incorporate the first 2 mostly (with a lower rep focus on the larger movements) and will throw in high rep every once in a while to burn out the muscle, increase size or just to do something different since I get bored easily.

My advice to you is to play around with it and try. keep a record of what you lift AND if you think you can lift heavier next time. You can always try a slightly heavier weight and if you only get 2 reps, be happy, drop the weight and finish your set. your results are determined by you alone. So make your gym time personal.

Now it’s your turn: Comment below with any questions you have on weightlifting OR the tips and tricks you have used to progress your lifts.

Oh, and let me know what your favorite lifts are when you train!

Michelle

mc-7174 WM